Author Archives: Alexander Pereira

Chicken Fajitas and Stir Fry

With just about all of Podcast Lost in Space going on ice after this month while we try to see how to continue, I wanted to leave you with one of the easiest, simplest and most versatile recipes I have.

This recipe is really good for dealing with leftover steak or chicken, cleaning out veggies from a fridge or things like that. I’m going to list the common ingredients that I like in my mix so it’s Chicken Fajitas.

tsp = teaspoon

Tbsp = Tablespoon

lbs = Pounds

Mince = chop into very small pieces

Diced = You chop the thing into roughly square like shapes

Cubed = Actually what it says, cut the ingredients into rough cubes, much bigger than diced

Sliced = Cut into thin broad strips (usually circles)

Chopped = to cut into small pieces with repeated blows

Al Dente = Pasta and/or Vegetables, Rice or Beans that are cooked to be firm to the bite. – Another way to put it is that it’s cooked but not fully cooked

Simmer = stay just below the boiling point while being heated. (small occasional bubble)

Saute = cook with oil

Fold = Mix the ingredients by scooping the bottom of the mix onto the top of the mix.

Reserve = Hold on/Don’t discard. Usually a liquid that is normally considered waste.

Tools needed:

  • 1-2 Large Fry Pan(s) w/ Lid
  • Cutting board
  • Chopping knife
  • Pair of Plates or tortilla steamer
  • Olive Oil
  • Oven (if you want)
  • Medium bowl (Microwave safe)

Ingredients

Stir Fry Mix

  • 1 Bell Peppers (Cut into Thin Strips)
  • 1 Large Onion (Chopped)
  • 3 Carrots (Sliced)
  • 2 Chicken Breasts
  • 3+Tbsp Teryaki Sauce (To Taste)
  • Salt (To Taste)
  • Garlic Powder (To Taste)
  • Oregano (To Taste)

Fajita

  • Flour (or Corn) Tortillas
  • 1 can of Re-fried Black Beans – I recommend getting black beans from the local Mexican store if you can.
  • Shredded Cheese of your preference (I use cheddar)
  • Shredded Lettuce (1 Bag of “salad” lettuce if you’re lazy)

Directions:

  1. Season the Chicken Breasts with Oregano, Salt and Garlic Powder
  2. You can either saute the chicken in the large fry pan, and cover it with the lid to help steam it or bake it if you so desire.
    1. The chicken doesn’t have to be full cooked but if you want it to be, it should be white all the way through and at 165 Degrees Fahrenheit, but it will be cooked more.
  3. Saute the onions until lightly golden brown and then add the rest of the vegetables.
  4. Season the vegetable mix with salt, oregano and garlic salt to taste. Saute for 1 minute.
  5. Add meat to the mix and add the Teriyaki sauce. Saute until vegetables are soft or the meat is fully cooked.
  6. While the stir fry is cooking, move the beans to the microwave safe bowl and microwave for three minutes.
  7. Heat up the Tortillas for 30 seconds in the microwave just before serving to help with folding. Use the plates as a base and lid or use the Tortilla steamer if you have it.
  8. Serve and Enjoy while warm!

Also for all of you, enjoy this how to on how to wrap a burrito. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZiIq4OmUzMc

Podcast Lost In Space 27!

It’s Podcast Lost In Space 27! Seneca, Alyssa and Alexander gather for the first bi-monthly episode. This time around we talk about our experiences moving.

Follow Us: @PLISOfficial on Twitter or on Facebook at Podcast Lost In Space and on Youtube atTPLIS Official

Many thanks to Peter Scott for his awesome Intro/Outro Music! Everyone go check him out! https://soundcloud.com/peterscott-3

And many more thanks to Matthew Jager for his amazing graphics and banners! Check him out at mjagerdesign.com and on Twitter at @TheSeattleOne

Stories are everywhere. Keep telling them.

 

In my final quarter of university, I had to take a ‘portfolio’ class. The idea behind the class was to help students tie all of their humanities learning together into something they could talk about. It was all about figuring out what we’d been doing in school and cementing those last few lessons the university was supposed to be teaching us (like how to sell our skills). Mostly it was a bollocks class that tried to teach me how to write a gods damned essay for the billionth time, we made roadmaps of our time in University of Washington Bothell (Pictures). The one thing I can credit the class with was it did help me realize that I love stories. As a mythology-focused anthropologist, writer and – at the time – game designer, I am fascinated by the stories we tell to define the world around us. As an educator, I’ve come to realize that one of the most important tools you can equip a person with is the ability to tell their own stories.

Stories are the life blood of humanity. Almost as soon as we can talk, we’re telling tales. Young children always have something they want to tell you, even if they’re literally retelling the last twenty seconds of events. But we put down these tools of imagination as we grow up, swapping them for the technical, quantifiable and testable skills of science, technology, engineering and math or abandoning them out of self-consciousness. By middle school/junior high, the kids who still fight invisible monsters and pretend to grand adventures are weird or childish. Either kids are aimed at the drama department or left to tell stories on their own time, with the implication that stories are for reading and the odd project, not real life. The script is wrong.

I have run Dungeon & Dragons, D&D, for middle schoolers, LARPed (live action roleplay) with elementary school kids in the woods and watched twelve-year olds write and draw comics far better than anything I could have done, and been paid for all of them. I’ve run programs for kids who wanted to make video games, stop motion movies, or live action movies. Seen kids who hate reading record themselves playing a game, pretending they’re Youtubers recording for an audience. Through all of them, I’ve seen kids learn how to communicate, cooperate and collaborate. They’ve learned teamwork, leadership and some sneaky math to boot. But most importantly, they learned that it’s still okay to express themselves in narrative. That ‘actual adults’ haven’t completely given up on telling stories. These groups of kids weren’t just the nerds and geeks of their peer group either. Jocks, preps and all the other social groups played D&D in the program. Even the most serious kids found a niche for themselves during the Live Action Roleplay where we pretended the camp was a feudal realm and hit each other with foam swords in the woods. The joy on their faces, especially the older ones, the ones ‘aging out’ of the world of storytelling, was a sight to see.

Now, I’m almost sure we’ve fallen trap of thinking here. How many of you kept thinking of books, comics and movies when I was talking about stories?  Maybe some of you went to plays instead, bravo. I knew the trap was there and I still fell into as I wrote this. I don’t know if we can truly avoid it with the way English is structured but the trap is still a falsehood.

There are the obvious ways to tell a story. You can write a book, an article or a poem. You can film a movie. You can act a tale. You can draw, or animate. But there are other ways, less obvious ways. Musicians, those who free style or those who play from sheet music are telling a story in the flow of the music. The composers of songs use the notes to tell the audience a tale, if you know how to listen. Dancers tell their own stories, and not just the interpretive dancers. Even the technically adherent ballerina is part of retelling a story of a choreographer. Artists of every type leave a story behind in their pieces. You can draw a literal storyboard but even the most absurdly abstract piece of art says something. That two thousandth still life study that a power art student is doing right now still describes the fruit and the moment in time, and in collection with the other thousand, the artist’s growth (or lack of). Photographers have their own maximum for it, ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’.

Maybe you don’t want to be an artist though. You like all the science and maths you do. Great, but even the simple chemistry equation tells a story. Maybe not be an interesting one but it’s there. The least obvious of all storytelling techniques is the most common though. You can say it. Kids start telling stories before they start writing them, people have been telling stories since before writing existed. You do it all the time anyway, like when you talk about James from Accounting or tell your friend what you did over the weekend. The trick is realizing you’re doing it.

Tell stories on purpose. It doesn’t matter how; it doesn’t matter if they’re good; it doesn’t even matter if they’re math equations. Stories are the soul of humanity. No one has every truly stopped telling them and it’s about time we realize that.

Podcast Lost in Space Episode 26!

We’re finally back for Podcast Lost in Space Episode 26! We check in with the entire crew and then let Alyssa talk for about half of it about what she’d been doing (more than Alexander and Seneca). We talk about school, Networking and I get to talk briefly about my writing. Oh and our friend Madelyn sits in for occasional colour commentary.

Follow Us: @PLISOfficial on Twitter or on Facebook at Podcast Lost In Space and on Youtube atTPLIS Official

Many thanks to Peter Scott for his awesome Intro/Outro Music! Everyone go check him out! https://soundcloud.com/peterscott-3

And many more thanks to Matthew Jager for his amazing graphics and banners! Check him out at mjagerdesign.com and on Twitter at @TheSeattleOne

Changes to PLIS

Podcast Lost in Space originally was started by Alexander as an experiment, to see if we could pull it off. One of the things that the team has learned was that we bit off more than we could chew right off the bat, so we are going to be making some changes over the next couple months.

The main Podcast Lost In Space podcast is shifting from a weekly to biweekly schedule, with Podcast Lost In Games podcast filling in PLIS’s off weeks – with a bonus podcast from one of the podcasts for 5 week long months! The Ben and Doc Show is going to still be weekly for the time being.

We are also debating if we will be maintaining our blog portion of Podcast Lost In Space. As it stand, we’re going to shift to a dedicated four posts a month, with week five being an off, or bonus week depending. We will be evaluating and debating whether or not the team/ PLIS will switchover only to podcasts due since our members all lead rather full lives outside of PLIS activities/duties.

 

Now, what can you do to keep us going?

At this point, let us know how you are feeling about the content we are putting up! Leave us Comments on the site, send us emails to podcastlostinspace@gmail.com or otherwise let us know what you think!

If there is a topic you’d love to see more of, love for us to talk about in the first place, or maybe go in depth on. Let us know! You can always email us or leave us a comment to let us know!

 

Thank you for your continued support!

 

Podcast Lost in Space.

Cake Recipe – Sad Puppy Edition

There would’ve been a lovely cake recipe here but Alyssa didn’t get it in before she left for all her adventures.

Enjoy this Sad Puppy instead.

Podcast Lost in Space Episode 25!

It’s a short podcast today! Join Alexander and Seneca as we talk about daylight savings time and his embarrassing inability to be smooth. It’s Podcast Lost in Space Episode 25!

Follow Us: @PLISOfficial on Twitter or on Facebook at Podcast Lost In Space and on Youtube atTPLIS Official

Many thanks to Peter Scott for his awesome Intro/Outro Music! Everyone go check him out! https://soundcloud.com/peterscott-3

And many more thanks to Matthew Jager for his amazing graphics and banners! Check him out at mjagerdesign.com and on Twitter at @TheSeattleOne

Podcast Lost in Space Episode 24!

We got a full house today for Podcast Lost in Space Episode 24! We pull in “special” guest Joey again as we talk about Alcohol and what we think about it and how its affected us.

Check out Joey on Twitter and at his Twitch

Follow Us: @PLISOfficial on Twitter or on Facebook at Podcast Lost In Space and on Youtube atTPLIS Official

Many thanks to Peter Scott for his awesome Intro/Outro Music! Everyone go check him out! https://soundcloud.com/peterscott-3

And many more thanks to Matthew Jager for his amazing graphics and banners! Check him out at mjagerdesign.com and on Twitter at @TheSeattleOne

Peak Into A Writer’s World Bible – Founding Myth

Hey Everyone, Alexander here.

I’m swinging in for a last minute clutch post because the first post of the month is always the hardest for us to organize. Since our writing section is more than a little anemic, despite me being a writer — and because, I’ve forgotten the post I wanted to do about four separate times in the last two days — I thought it’d be fun to take advantage of this chaos to give you all a little glimpse into my writing notes and pull something out that might not normally see the light of day.

I do so much writing that simply can not make its way into the shorts or novels in anything more than hints but that help me give the world a sense of depth that my readers can sense. Or, more honestly, let me stop obsessing about a particular idea. You might never see the detailed anatomy of a historic country’s geopolitical make up , hell you may only see the country mentioned once or twice ever. But that doesn’t mean I didn’t spell out its entire history from founding to “present” because it has its own natural effects on history.

Where does one start? Why in Myth and Legend, of course! This is how the Universe was Born.

The worlds have always been, The Firstbornes gave them life. For they were great travelers who first crossed worlds. Yet they grew lonely for the worlds they crossed were uniformly barren and lost, separated from each other and lightless. Some among the Firstborne saw the truth of creation, that the worlds they saw were seeds of hope and potential needing light. Those Who Saw convened a great council of the Firstborne to convince them a great sacrifice was necessary. The Firstborne knew it was their duty to creation to give these seeds a chance to blossom so Those Who Became sacrificed themselves by the thousands to give every world its own set of stars to guide creation’s potential. Yet, the Ones Who Set the Stars were of the same people. Thus the life of many worlds can interact with each other and indeed many creatures can thrive on worlds not their own.

But not every Firstborne joined their brethren amongst the heavens. Some were given a harder duty, for the young new species emerging would need the guiding hand of their elder to. Even the Firstborne knew creation could be cruel. Those Who Remained were given the task of protecting the new saplings from predations of that borne in the darkness. For some things only birthed themselves in shadow and lightlessness and they hungered for spark of life they lacked. Those Who Remained split all of creation into two kingdomsL the Praeskensha (Kingdom of the Guardians) and the Etominru (The Kingdom of the Starless). The Praeskensha watched over the worlds of Stars while the Etominru held vigillant in the worlds of darkness, the vanguard of all their brethren had sacrificed. So peace reigned and life blossomed.

That Seemed really clean and ready for publishing didn’t it?

Wanna see the OneNote Page?

OneNote Screen Shot - Glimpse in a Notebook Cropped

It’s Not quite as clean is it?

Oh and Don’t Worry. We’ll get to the Textile and Dye Materials Page. That’ll be Fun.

Well this was fun. Thanks for letting me indulge in parading my world-building around for a few minutes.

Podcast Lost In Space Episode 23!

We got Seneca back! It’s a party of three as Alexander, Seneca and Alyssa gather together to talk about our old mentors (we let Alyssa talk alot) and some stupid cereal thing that got us really talking. It’s Podcast Lost in Space Episode 23!

Check out the silly cereal article!

Follow Us: @PLISOfficial on Twitter or on Facebook at Podcast Lost In Space and on Youtube atTPLIS Official

Many thanks to Peter Scott for his awesome Intro/Outro Music! Everyone go check him out! https://soundcloud.com/peterscott-3

And many more thanks to Matthew Jager for his amazing graphics and banners! Check him out at mjagerdesign.com and on Twitter at @TheSeattleOne